Application Computational Scientist

Organization
The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine
Job Location
10 Discovery Drive
Farmington, CT 06032
Job Description

The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, based in Farmington, CT is seeking an Application Computational Scientist to join our Computational Sciences – Statistics & Analytics (CS-SA) group. This position offers an opportunity to make leading contributions to cutting edge research and operations in disease genomics and translational research in collaboration with the faculty and the clients of The Jackson Laboratory. Interdisciplinary collaborations are encouraged.

The Application Scientist reports to a Computational scientist and has the primary responsibility of providing sequencing analytics and data interpretation to the scientific research programs at The Jackson Laboratory.

 

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will:

 •  Have a Ph.D. in bioinformatics, biostatistics, computer science, statistics or any relevant field   of study OR a relevant MS and substantial research experience in bioinformatics

•  Have a proven track record of working in a dynamic high performance research team environment

•  Demonstrate the aptitude and capacity to work in highly demanding research and genomics operations

•  Be a creative contributor and be eager to learn new technologies and science

Requirements
  • Experience in High Throughput Sequence (HTS) data analysis, development of sequence analysis tools (bioinformatics programming) & pipelines, evaluation of analytical tools and technologies, and delivering training to the research community
  • Proficiency in Unix/Bash, Python, Perl, R or similar preferred.
  • Experience with bioinformatic tools and databases (GATK, TCGA, UCSC Genome Browser, IGV etc.) is required
  • Experience in experimental design, data integration, algorithm development is a plus
  • Familiarity with evolutionary biology, genomic structural variations and clinical genomics is a plus
  • Excellent inter-personal and communication skills including skills necessary to present at conferences and workshops, write study designs, and analytical methods
How to Apply

Application

Interested candidates may submit applications online to (www.jax.org/careers), requisition #4914 that includes a CV, list of publications, a brief statement of research interests along with a cover letter.

About Our Organization

The Jackson Laboratory is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution based in Bar Harbor, Maine, with a facility in Sacramento, Calif., and a new genomic medicine institute in Farmington, Conn. We employ more than 200 Ph.D. scientists and a total of more than 1,400 employees. In 2011 and 2012, researchers voted The Jackson Laboratory among the world’s top 15 “Best Places to Work in Academia” in a poll conducted by The Scientist, a magazine for people working in the life sciences. The Laboratory draws on an 83-year reputation for excellence in mammalian genetics, built on the groundbreaking discoveries of its own researchers and on the development and global distribution of the most diverse collection of genetically unique mouse strains in the world. The Jackson Laboratory is a National Cancer Institute – designated cancer center. Our research covers a broad range of genetic disorders, including cancer, diabetes, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmune disorders, and conditions related to reproduction, development and aging. The Laboratory’s mission is to discover the genetic basis for preventing, treating and curing disease, and to enable research and education for the global biomedical community.

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