2 Postdoctoral positions in protein translation and coding sequence evolution

Organization
Rutgers University
Job Location
New Brunswick, NJ 08854
Job Description

Two postdoctoral fellowships (2-3 years) are available in the group of Dr. Premal Shah at Rutgers University at New Brunswick, NJ (http://www.theshahlab.org). The specific research project is flexible and can be tailored to the interests of the individual, but it will fall under the broad purview of regulation of protein translation and evolution of coding sequences. 

1. Computational biology position: 

Requirements for the position include a proven record of self-motivated research; a PhD in mathematics, statistics, physics, biology or related area; excellent communication skills. The ideal candidate should also be familiar with scientific programming.

2. Molecular biology position: 

Requirements for the position include a proven record of self-motivated research; a PhD in biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology or related area; excellent communication skills. The ideal candidate should have extensive experience in RNA biology, with an interest to work on ribosome profiling. 

The postdoctoral fellows would have considerable freedom in developing their own research program, with the resources needed to distinguish themselves. In addition, the fellows will have several opportunities to interact and forge collaborations with research groups both at Rutgers as well as other institutions in the Philadelphia-New York corridor. 

The postdoctoral fellowships provide a competitive annual stipend and health insurance. Start date and terms are negotiable. Applications are welcome from candidates of any nationality. Women and under-represented minorities are especially encouraged to apply.

How to Apply

Applicants should email a statement of research interests, CV, and contact details for references to [email protected]. Informal inquiries are also welcomed.

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