NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – As part of its High-Risk/High-Reward Research Program, the National Institutes of Health has awarded a University of California, San Diego investigator a five-year, $3.8 million grant to develop a technology to map complete RNA interactomes in cells or tissues using high-throughput DNA sequencing.

According to UCSD's Sheng Zhong, the funding will be used to further refine the technology, as well as to investigate the mechanisms underlying cell fate decisions in early mammalian development.

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Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.

Nov
14
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