NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The National Cancer Institute has awarded University of Washington researcher Mary-Claire King a $4.2 million grant to support her use of next-generation sequencing technology to uncover the genetic causes of inherited breast and ovarian cancer.

The seven-year grant comes through the agency's Outstanding Investigator Award program. King, a Lasker Foundation Award winner, is perhaps best known for her discovery of BRCA1, a homologous recombination repair gene that significantly increases breast cancer risk when mutated.

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The ancestors of the Arizona bark scorpion and other scorpions and spiders underwent whole-genome duplication, KJZZ reports.

A cryptographic approach could help researchers keep genomic data private while researchers analyze it, Scientific American reports.

Andy Page, the former president of 23andMe, has joined a diabetes-management startup, according to CNBC.

In Cell this week: regulatory changes in pancreatic cancer, metabolic shifts in Alzheimer's disease, and more.

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