NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Cellecta announced today that it has been awarded a Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to complete development of a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screening platform that it aims to commercialize by late 2018.

CRISPR/Cas9 involves the use of an enzyme to cause double-strand DNA breaks that induce gene silencing. The process can be targeted to specific areas of the genome using so-called single guide RNAs (sgRNAs).

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While gene therapies may have high price tags, they could be cheaper than the cost of managing disease, according to MIT's Technology Review.

Researchers are looking for markers that indicate which cancer patients may respond to immunotherapies, the Associated Press writes.

In Nature this week: paternal age associated with de novo mutations in children, and more.

Nature News writes that researchers are still wrangling over the role of the p-value.

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