NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A group of researchers led by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network at Vanderbilt University surveyed physicians for their perspectives on genomic test results they didn't order, which the researchers termed "unsolicited genomics results" (UGRs). The investigators asked the doctors how such information has affected their clinical practices and patients, in order to understand clinicians' worries and provide a more complete picture of how genomic screening could be used with real-time healthcare delivery.

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Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.

In PLOS this week: grey wolf population genomics, mutations associated with lung adenocarcinoma survival, and more.

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

Nov
27
Sponsored by
Genialis & Roche

While next-generation sequencing (NGS) has driven recent advances in precision oncology research, it often falls short when identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying many malignancies. As a result, alternative NGS-based approaches are needed to identify oncogenic drivers and potential drug targets.

Dec
06
Sponsored by
Genomenon

Rhythm Pharmaceuticals and Genomenon will discuss their efforts to assemble a database of mutations associated with rare genetic disorders of obesity, and how this was optimized to facilitate a deep understanding of the variant landscape of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R)-pathway genes. This database may help identify MC4R-pathway deficient individuals who might benefit from future precision therapies.