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Celmatix, Ferring Pharmaceuticals Partner to Study Genomics of IVF Treatment Response

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Celmatix and Ferring Pharmaceuticals said today that they are collaborating on genomics research to better understand a woman’s response to in vitro fertilization treatment.

Specifically, the partners plan to use Celmatix’s proprietary knowledgebase to investigate whether a woman’s response to ovarian stimulation during IVF treatment is linked to genomic characteristics. The hope is that such results could help to reduce adverse and life-threatening outcomes, such as ovarian hyper-simulation syndrome, and to lower cancellations of IVF cycles due to poor treatment response.

According to Klaus Dugi, chief medical officer of Saint-Prex, Switzerland-based Ferring, evidence exists that levels of anti-Müllerian hormone can predict response to IVF. "Through this unique collaboration with Celmatix, we want to pave the way for even greater personalization of care, with the ultimate aim of improving women's experience of treatment and IVF success rates for families around the world," he said in a statement.

Celmatix, based in New York City, offers the Fertilome test, a multi-gene panel that assesses variants associated with reproductive health conditions. It also provides a web-based predictive data analytics platform called Polaris that includes clinical and outcomes data from patients undergoing fertility treatment, and a data-driven education tool for women called MyFertility Compass.

Ferring Pharmaceuticals, which has about 6,500 employees worldwide, focuses on treatments for reproductive medicine and women’s health, as well as in specialty areas within gastroenterology and urology.

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