After helping start several companies while at the Stanford Research Institute, Luke Schneider finally decided five years ago that it was time to go out and do his own thing. He figured proteomics would be his best bet, not only because it was fairly new, but also because he had first-hand experience with the frustrations of running 2D gels and realized there was room for a company offering an alternative.

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Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.

The New York Times reports that evidence linking trauma in one generation to epigenetic effects that influence subsequent generations may be overstated.

ScienceInsider reports that US National Institutes of Health researchers were told in the fall they could not obtain new human fetal tissue.

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.