A Synchrotron Beamline Right on Your Lab s Desktop? Stanford Start-Up Says it Can Do it | GenomeWeb

Mass spectrometers are not the only large proteomics instruments to be shrinking in size these days: The equivalent of a giant synchrotron light source used in high-throughput protein structure determination can now fit on a laboratory desktop, according to Palo Alto, Calif. start-up Lyncean Technologies.

Lyncean, founded in 2001 by Stanford professor Ronald Ruth and two staff members from the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, developed the technology based on research that Ruth conducted at Stanford, where he is now on a part-time leave of absence.

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