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Sigma-Aldrich Inks Peptide Distribution Deal

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Sigma-Aldrich today said that CPC Scientific will sell the firm's PEPscreen custom peptide libraries to life science researchers and pharmaceutical companies in North America.

San Jose, Calif.-based CPC specializes in peptide synthesis and supplying GMP peptides to researchers.

Sigma said that it has developed a synthesis platform that enables high-throughput production of milligram quantities of peptides, which are ideal for making custom peptides that would be used in drug discovery efforts.

"CPC's close association with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry provides great opportunities for Sigma-Aldrich to further engage drug discovery researchers," said Stacey Hoge, senior product manager for Sigma-Aldrich, in a statement.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In a separate announcement today, Sigma said that its SAFC Pharma business segment had commenced operations at its new 7,000-square-feet laboratory in Carlsbad, Calif. The new complex includes a dedicated PCR facility, a tissue culture lab, and a scientific team focused on quality control process development, assay development, and validation.

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