Close Menu

Most researchers trying their hands at protein arrays have resorted to spotters, widely used in the DNA array field, as their tool of choice for placing proteins at their assigned locations. The technology is reliable and fairly reproducible, but it suffers a few drawbacks: it requires access to a spotter, the arrays are not identical, and high-volume spotting can take a long time. To address this problem, at least three groups of researchers have developed an alternative that might be called sushi arrays.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a GenomeWeb or 360Dx Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

The Washington Post reports that Herbert Tabor, who worked at the US National Institutes of Health for 77 years, has died at 101.

The World Bank is seeking approval for a $12 billion plan to provide low-income nations with funds to procure SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, according to Reuters.

Science writes that public health officials and others are debating whether cycle threshold values should be included on SARS-CoV-2 results.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: online database of SARS-CoV-2 protein structures, atlas of the human brain, and more.

Oct
14
Sponsored by
Inivata

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can allow clinicians and researchers to better understand which patients are at high risk of recurrence and should be offered intensified chemotherapy or selected for clinical trials.

Oct
29
Sponsored by
Illumina

Illumina’s BaseSpace Sequence Hub (BSSH) supports primary and secondary analysis of massively parallel sequencing data and can be applied to gene panel data that is generated as part of a clinical cancer assay performed in a pathology lab.