The global proteomics market is projected to grow nearly six-fold to $5.6 billion by 2006, according to market research conducted by Frost & Sullivan. In 2000, the total market was $963 million, the consultancy said.

In a report released in August, Frost & Sullivan said the discovery that the human genome contains fewer genes than originally predicted has elevated the potential importance of proteins and led to an interest in proteome-wide studies.

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Science speaks with the University of Michigan's Jedidiah Carlson, who has tracked population genetic discussions at white nationalist sites.

NPR reports that the US House of Representatives has passed a bill to enable terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs.

In Genome Research this week: inversion variants mapped in human, non-human primate genomes; transcriptome profiling of maize, sorghum; and more.

US News & World Report writes that genetic testing of lung tumors can help identify treatments for patients.

Jun
19
Sponsored by
ACD

This webinar will provide evidence for the use of RNA in situ hybridization (RNA ISH) as a replacement for immunohistochemistry (IHC) in cancer research and diagnostic applications.