Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

New Data Demonstrates Increased Sensitivity When Vermillion's OVA1 is Used with Imaging

Premium

According to data presented this week at the European Society of Gynecological Oncology meeting in Milan, Vermillion's OVA1 ovarian cancer diagnostic achieved 98.1 percent sensitivity when used in conjunction with imaging.

Presented by Fred Ueland, associate professor of gynecological oncology at the University of Kentucky's Markey Cancer Center and principal investigator of the multi-center OVA1 clinical trial, the research also showed that OVA1 in combination with imaging demonstrated a negative predictive value of 96.3 percent.

In previous studies, OVA1 without imaging demonstrated 94 percent sensitivity when used as part of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' referral guidelines, as well as 98 percent sensitivity in early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer and 93 percent in premenopausal early-stage cancers (PM 05/27/2011).

The presentation comes one week after the US Food & Drug Administration granted 510(k) clearance for Fujirebio Diagnostics' Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm, or ROMA, test for ovarian cancer, a potential competitor to OVA1. In a study of 472 women, the ROMA test demonstrated sensitivity of 93.8 percent, but significantly higher specificity than OVA1 (PM 09/09/2011).

The Scan

US Booster Eligibility Decision

The US CDC director recommends that people at high risk of developing COVID-19 due to their jobs also be eligible for COVID-19 boosters, in addition to those 65 years old and older or with underlying medical conditions.

Arizona Bill Before Judge

The Arizona Daily Star reports that a judge weighing whether a new Arizona law restricting abortion due to genetic conditions is a ban or a restriction.

Additional Genes

Wales is rolling out new genetic testing service for cancer patients, according to BBC News.

Science Papers Examine State of Human Genomic Research, Single-Cell Protein Quantification

In Science this week: a number of editorials and policy reports discuss advances in human genomic research, and more.