NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Researchers from the National Cancer Institute have sequenced the protein-coding portions of the NCI-60 human cancer cell line genomes, using the data to look for genetic contributors to drug response in the well-characterized cell line panel.

As they reported online today in Cancer Research, the researchers initially used whole-exome sequence data for the 60 cancer cell lines to put together a list of mutations suspected of being cancer-specific.

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23andMe's Anne Wojcicki ponders DNA and what it means to be human in a New York Times essay.

A new estimate places the last universal common ancestor to life on Earth as living 3.9 billion years ago, Inverse reports.

In PNAS this week: retinitis pigmentosa gene therapy, role of microbiome in growth stunting, and more.

Bloomberg reports that researchers and drug companies are modeling anti-obesity treatments after the rare genetic condition essential fructosuria.

Aug
23
Sponsored by
Tecan

This webinar will discuss an automated, high-throughput method of generating high-quality antigens and antibodies.

Oct
10
Sponsored by
Philips Genomics

This webinar will provide a first-hand look at how the Dana-Farber Cancer Center is adapting its oncology care strategy in light of the rapidly evolving molecular landscape.