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KineMed, MedImmune Studying Role of Protein Dynamics in Neurodegenerative Diseases

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – KineMed today announced an agreement with MedImmune to study the effects of a monoclonal antibody on the dynamics of the cellular prion protein.

MedImmune, the biologics research development arm of AstraZeneca, will use KineMed's technology to track the prion protein to gain a better understanding of how an antibody directed at the cellular prion protein may affect turnover and expression of the protein at the cell surface.

KineMed's technology uses wide-scale isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to track protein activity kinetics, which can elucidate biological pathways and disease processes.

Emeryville, Calif.-based KineMed said that cellular prion protein is found in healthy people, but in neurodegenerative conditions, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the protein has an altered conformation and function. The prion protein has also been associated in recent research with Alzheimer's disease, the company added.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

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