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Germany's Synlab to Use Bruker Mass Spec Tech for Microbial Identification

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Bruker Daltonics and German diagnostic lab association Synlab have forged an agreement in the area of molecular microbial identification based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, Bruker said today.

Under the agreement, Synlab will equip its laboratories exclusively with Bruker's MALDI Biotyper system for molecular microbial identification.

In addition, Bruker and Synlab intend to further enlarge and refine the MALDI Biotyper reference library using well-defined clinical isolates from Synlab's routine microbiology work.

Synlab, a European private diagnostic laboratory association, has more than 70 diagnostic laboratories in Germany and other European countries. Synlab’s clinical microbiology centers in Trier, Weiden, and Dachau, Germany, already routinely use the MALDI Biotyper, Bruker said.

"After evaluating the MALDI Biotyper very thoroughly within the Synlab group, we are convinced that Bruker Daltonics is the most reliable partner for microbial identification based on mass spectrometry, and is providing outstanding microbiological service and support," Ulrich Knipp, technical head of microbiology at Synlab in Trier, said in a statement.

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