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Former employees of protein biomarker discovery firm NextGen Sciences have sued the company for failing to pay compensation they claim is owed them.

In a suit filed last month in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan Southern Division, the six employees – Eric Simon, Bhavin Patel, Andreas Jeromin, Hiroshi Saito, Christine Verellen, and Joanne Tobias – alleged that the company and its officers Leif Hamoe and Thomas Borcholte failed to pay them wages owed for the period Aug. 1, 2012, through Oct. 10, 2012, totaling $115,002.

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At a meeting this week, researchers and others discussed the regulatory oversight needed for germline genome editing.

The US Food and Drug Administration has asked questions about Myriad Genetics' GeneSight test, according to Bloomberg.

Researchers report that neutrophil extracellular traps appear to binds gallstones together, according to New Scientist.

In Science this week: approach to infer genotype-by-environment interaction from genetic variants associated with phenotypic variability, and more.

Aug
22
Sponsored by
BC Platforms

This webinar will discuss how the Estonian Biobank, a cohort of more than 165,000 participants, is addressing industry challenges with data management and collaboration in the transition to precision medicine.

Oct
23
Sponsored by
Swift Biosciences

This webinar will illustrate how single-cell methylation sequencing can be applied to gain significant insight into epigenetic heterogeneity in disease states, advancing cancer research discoveries.