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Cell Biosciences Places Protein Analysis Prototype at Stanford

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Palo Alto, Calif.-based nanoproteomics company Cell Biosciences announced today that it has placed a prototype of a next-generation protein analysis system at Stanford University’s School of Medicine.
 
The company said that David Hirschberg, director of Stanford’s Human Immune Monitoring Center, will use Cell Biosciences’ CB1000 system for analyzing human clinical samples and will provide feedback aimed at improving product design and optimizing system features.
 
The CB1000 is a nanofluidic immunoassay system developed for the sensitive analysis of small biological samples. Compared with earlier systems, the new prototype is designed to have a more streamlined workflow, smaller footprint, and improved performance. It can reportedly measure signaling proteins reproducibly using as few as 25 cells.
 
The system is scheduled for commercial release in mid-2009.
 

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