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Bruker Inks Collaborations with CDC, JMI for MALDI Biotyper

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Bruker announced today at the 112th General Meeting of the American Society of Microbiology two new collaborations using its MALDI Biotyper system.

The company said it will collaborate with the Special Bacteriology Reference Laboratory of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to test the Biotyper's utility for identifying rare and unusual bacteria. It also announced that it will collaborate with JMI Laboratories on using the platform for identification of fungal infections.

Financial and other terms of the agreements were not provided.

The CDC collaboration is slated to last one year, during which time the facility will compare the performance of the Biotyper to traditional phenotypic and genetic tests to determine the value of including it as part of the organization's rare bacteria identification workflow.

The JMI collaboration will likewise focus on validating the Biotyper – in this case for fungi identification – to determine if the instrument can replace or supplement the company's existing biochemical tests.

Both deals will also allow Bruker to add to the Biotyper's database of protein fingerprint profiles, expanding the instrument's bacterial and fungal identification capabilities.

Biochemical- and PCR-based testing have traditionally dominated the bacteria identification market, but in recent years researchers and clinicians have begun exploring proteomic techniques – most commonly MALDI-MS – for this purpose.

The MALDI Biotyper identifies bacteria by matching their protein fingerprints against fingerprints contained in Bruker's proprietary database. The company launched the platform in Europe in 2006 and has since installed more than 250 of the devices worldwide. The device received an IVD-CE mark from the EU in 2009 and Health Canada approval in 2011.

Bruker also plans to submit the device to the US Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance, which it expects to receive by the end of the year.

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