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Somalogic Licenses GNS Healthcare Machine Learning Tech

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Somalogic said today it has licensed GNS Healthcare's REFS (Reverse Engineering & Forward Simulation) causal machine learning technology.

Somalogic said it will use the REFS technology to analyze protein datasets generated by its SomaScan proteomic platform to convert them into information that can be used in meaningful ways to manage health at the individual and population levels.

Financial and other terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

"Our ability to measure 5,000 proteins in each of hundreds of thousands of samples requires that we be able to analyze all those data in a way that will ultimately result in making a difference for individuals and their health providers," Somalogic CEO Alister Reynolds said in a statement. "We believe that GNS Healthcare's powerful REFS technology has the potential to become a critical tool for extracting those meaningful health insights."

GNS Healthcare Cofounder and CEO Colin Hill added that the firm's REFS platform has proven itself "repeatedly with genomic, transcriptomic, metabolite, clinical, labs, EMR, claims, and other data types," and that he looks forward to seeing how it performs on real-time proteins.

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