Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

IsoPlexis Wins $2M SBIR Grant From NCI

NEW YORK – Single-cell proteomics firm IsoPlexis said today it has received a $2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Development Center.

The grant will fund development of methods using the company's IsoLight system to study protein signaling pathways in single tumor cells, allowing for improved analysis of cancer signaling and tumor heterogeneity.

Isoplexis's platform uses microchips featuring arrays of thousands of microchambers that isolate individual cells from samples of interest. These chambers are then sealed with a slide that is patterned with groups of antibodies in a number of different spatially isolated lines. This allows the researchers to identify proteins based on the color of fluorescence produced upon binding and the location on the slide where the binding event occurs. In this way, they can multiplex well beyond the levels allowed by fluorescence readout alone.

The award follows a $4 million SBIR grant the company received earlier this year as well as a $1.8 million SBIR grant it received in 2017.

The Scan

Enzyme Involved in Lipid Metabolism Linked to Mutational Signatures

In Nature Genetics, a Wellcome Sanger Institute-led team found that APOBEC1 may contribute to the development of the SBS2 and SBS13 mutational signatures in the small intestine.

Family Genetic Risk Score Linked to Diagnostic Trajectory in Psychiatric Disorders

Researchers in JAMA Psychiatry find ties between high or low family genetic risk scores and diagnostic stability or change in four major psychiatric disorders over time.

Study Questions Existence of Fetal Microbiome

A study appearing in Nature this week suggests that the reported fetal microbiome might be the result of sample contamination.

Fruit Fly Study Explores Gut Microbiome Effects on Circadian Rhythm

With gut microbiome and gene expression experiments, researchers in PNAS see signs that the microbiome contributes to circadian rhythm synchronicity and stability in fruit flies.