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NEW YORK — Invicro said on Monday that it has partnered with the Yale University School of Medicine to refine an imaging-based tissue biomarker detection technology for clinical pathology applications.

Under the deal, Invicro — a Boston-based subsidiary of Konica Minolta — will work with Yale pathologist David Rimm to advance Quanticell, a technology that uses photostable and bright phosphor-integrated dots for quantitative, amplification-free detection of proteins at cellular and subcellular levels.

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The Washington Post reports that Herbert Tabor, who worked at the US National Institutes of Health for 77 years, has died at 101.

The World Bank is seeking approval for a $12 billion plan to provide low-income nations with funds to procure SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, according to Reuters.

Science writes that public health officials and others are debating whether cycle threshold values should be included on SARS-CoV-2 results.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: online database of SARS-CoV-2 protein structures, atlas of the human brain, and more.

Oct
14
Sponsored by
Inivata

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can allow clinicians and researchers to better understand which patients are at high risk of recurrence and should be offered intensified chemotherapy or selected for clinical trials.

Oct
29
Sponsored by
Illumina

Illumina’s BaseSpace Sequence Hub (BSSH) supports primary and secondary analysis of massively parallel sequencing data and can be applied to gene panel data that is generated as part of a clinical cancer assay performed in a pathology lab.