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Human Protein Atlas to Use Horizon Discovery Cell Models

NEW YORK — Horizon Discovery Group said today that its CRISPR-edited knockout cell models have been selected for use by the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) project.

Based in Sweden, the HPA was established in 2003 to map all the human proteins in cells, tissues, and organs using a variety of omics technologies. Horizon Discovery said that its cell models will be integrated into the HPA's Cell Atlas program, which focuses on the subcellular localization of proteins in single cells. HPA researchers will initially use 500 of the UK company's CRISPR-edited knockout cell models as part of large-scale protein expression and imaging studies.

Additional terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"We have previously used Horizon's cell lines in our high-throughput imaging processes with great success," Emma Lundberg, a Science for Life Laboratory researcher and head of the HPA's Cell Atlas program, said in a statement. "Using a validated gene-edited cell line where all cell models have the same background will be key to maximizing efficiency and achieving data reproducibility."

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