Study Provides Blueprint For Porting Lab-Developed PCR Assays to BD Max Open System | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — In cases where US Food and Drug Administration-cleared assays do not exist, clinicians often use their own lab-developed PCR assays to test for conditions of interest. This process can involve separate extraction and amplification steps, and extensive hands-on time.

Becton Dickinson has for the past few years promoted as a middle path its BD Max system, which runs FDA-cleared tests from the company and its partners but is also open to run lab-developed tests.

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Mar
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