Droplet digital PCR is no better than real-time PCR at detecting and quantifying low levels of cell-associated HIV-1 genetic material from samples taken from patients both on and off antiviral therapy, according to newly published study.

In addition, digital PCR analyses take more time and may be more expensive than real-time PCR for this specific application, said one of the study's authors, who nonetheless also noted that he is "optimistic" about the digital PCR platform — Bio-Rad's QX100 Droplet Digital PCR system — for future similar HIV studies.

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Researchers test gene therapy targeting a different cancer protein in a new trial, the New York Times reports.

Pennsylvania State University researchers found that salivary microRNAs could predict which kids would have longer concussion symptoms, according to NPR.

The Associated Press reports Alex Azar, the new Department of Health and Human Services secretary nominee, made millions of dollars as a pharmaceutical executive.

In PNAS this week: immune profiling of breast cancer, transposable element patterns in rice, and more.