NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Spurred by evidence that PCR of sputum, in addition to commonly tested nasal and pharyngeal swabs, can allow more sensitive diagnosis of respiratory viruses, researchers from the University of Rochester have published a study demonstrating their method for processing sputum to work with automated multiplex PCR instruments.

Without additional processing, sputum cannot be successfully analyzed using automated RT-PCR because of its viscosity, according to the study authors, so automated systems instead rely on swabs of the nose and throat.

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