Microfluidic devices have the potential to revolutionize PCR and molecular biology, in general. They promise to bring hand-held diagnostics to the developing world and save lives. But what is the best way to get original technologies from the hands of engineers and into the hands they were designed for?

Researchers at the University of Cambridge, Ali Yetisen and Lisa Volpatti, perceived a gap in the way their colleagues were thinking about this transition.

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