London-based web retailer Cool Components said this week that it has begun selling OpenPCR, an ultra-cheap pre-fabricated kit for assembling a personal thermal cycler.

OpenPCR began as a startup venture of Bay Area amateur biologists Tito Jankowski and Josh Perfetto. Their goal was to design and develop an "open-source" thermal cycler that could be assembled from off-the-shelf components with a cost of around $500 to woo potentials customers such as fellow DIY biologists or schools.

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UCSF researchers find that having two X chromosomes may contribute to women's longer lifespans, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

The Wall Street Journal reports on the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's use of genetic approaches to study foodborne illnesses.

In PNAS this week: immune cell profiling of wild baboons by social status, metabolomics profiling of esophageal tumors, and more.

A genomic analysis of modern and ancient maize reveals a complicated domestication history, according to Reuters.

Jan
30
Sponsored by
Loop Genomics

This webinar will provide a comparison of several next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches — including short-read 16S, whole-genome sequencing (WGS), and synthetic long-read sequencing technology — for use in microbiome research studies.

Jan
30
Sponsored by
Loop Genomics

This webinar will provide a comparison of several next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches — including short-read 16S, whole-genome sequencing (WGS), and synthetic long-read sequencing technology — for use in microbiome research studies.