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People in the News: Former Gen-Probe Head Carl Hull Steps Down as Part of Hologic Restructuring

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Hologic said this week that Carl Hull will retire from his role as senior vice president and general manager of diagnostics effective on Feb. 15.

Hull previously served as chairman, president, and CEO of Gen-Probe until that company was acquired by Hologic last year in a deal worth an estimated $3.7 billion (PCR Insider, 5/3/2012).

Hologic noted that the mutual agreement with Hull to retire was a result of the company being "ahead of schedule" in the ongoing integration of Gen-Probe and the solid foundation of the current diagnostics business. Hull will continue to serve as a consultant to the company until mid-August.

As part of the ongoing organizational changes, Rohan Hastie, formerly a vice president and general manager within the women's health group of Hologic's diagnostics segment, has been appointed senior vice president and group general manager of diagnostics. This position now includes overseeing the segment's women's health and virology businesses, as well as the US diagnostics sales team, Hologic said.

In addition, Eric Tardif, senior vice president of commercial operations for diagnostics, will assume the role of senior vice president of corporate strategy.

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