Australian Lab Uses Sound to Improve Reverse Transcription in Single-Cell Gene Expression Studies | GenomeWeb

By Ben Butkus

Australian scientists may soon be cranking up the music in their labs in order to improve the efficiency of their single-cell gene expression studies, thanks to a method developed by researchers from the University of Melbourne.

The technique, called acoustic microstreaming, improves cDNA yields from reverse transcription of single-cell quantities of RNA 10- to 100-fold over standard methods by promoting better reagent mixing — or "micromixing" — in standard PCR tubes, the researchers said.

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