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ArcticZymes and Tataa Biocenter Strike Sales and Distribution Pact

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Norwegian enzymes specialist ArcticZymes and Sweden's Tataa Biocenter this week announced a mutual sales and distribution deal covering Europe.

Terms of the agreement call for Tataa to sell ArcticZymes' heat-labile enzymes for use in contamination control through its sales channels; and to integrate ArcticZymes' products into its range of courses.

Additionally, ArcticZymes will launch two reference gene panels and the ValidPrime kits series from Tataa. The kits offer for the first time a "rational and economical tool" for determining DNA contamination level, the companies said.

In an e-mail to PCR Insider, Jan-Buch Andersen, managing director of ArcticZymes, said that the move was important for the company because "Tataa Biocenter is among the true technology leaders in the qPCR field. Coupling our contamination control enzymes with their new ValidPrime kit to detect DNA contamination for the first time offers a cost-effective and strong tool to determine and control contamination problems."

Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

ArcticZymes, based in Tromsø, Norway, was previously known as Marine Biochemicals. The company changed its name at the beginning of this year, when it also moved to a new facility at the Barents BioCenter at the Research Park in Tromsø.

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