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Molecular Biology Systems, Velocidy Bio Ink Distribution Deal

NEW YORK – Molecular Biology Systems, a pioneer of two-minute PCR, announced Wednesday that Velocidy Bio will distribute MBS' NextGenPCR instruments, accessories, and consumables in the US and Canada.

The Goes, Netherlands-based firm's NextGenPCR instrument enables two-minute, 30-cycle amplification. Consumables include 96- and 384-well sealed microplates and proprietary foil-piercing pipette tips to recover PCR products.

The NextGenPCR system accelerates the PCR protocol by using proprietary spatial thermal cycling. It has been adopted across laboratory segments, including public and private research and testing labs in academia, government, biotech, and pharmaceutical labs, MBS said in a statement, with an increasing rate of placements since launching two years ago.

Velocidy Bio is focused on accelerating laboratory protocols, with an initial emphasis on reducing the time required to extract, amplify, and analyze nucleic acids. 

"We look forward to working with Velocidy Bio, an innovative distributor focused on improving the laboratory experience by accelerating protocols," said MBS CEO Gert de Vos.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The NextGenPCR system is already distributed in Germany and other countries globally. It was previously distributed in the US by Canon Biomedical, Canon USA's life sciences subsidiary, until that firm ceased operations in January of last year.

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