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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The US Food and Drug Administration has granted Emergency Use Authorization for a Zika assay from Luminex, the firm announced today.

The test, called the xMAP MultiFLEX Zika RNA Assay, was designed by Luminex partner GenArraytion, a Rockville, Maryland-based diagnostics maker. The xMAP test is authorized to detect viral RNA in blood or serum, as well as urine samples collected and tested in conjunction with blood or serum. It will be provided to labs that are CLIA certified to run highly complex tests.

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