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Interpace Diagnostics Thyroid Assays Covered by Blue Shield of California

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Interpace Diagnostics said today that Blue Shield of California has agreed to cover Interpace's combination molecular thyroid tests, ThyGenX and ThyraMir.

Blue Shield of California, which serves more than 4 million health plan members and 65,000 physicians in the state, published positive medical policy coverage for the ThyGenX and ThyraMir assays for thyroid nodules deemed indeterminate by standard cytopathological analysis.

This is the eighth Blue Cross Blue Shield plan to grant positive coverage for Interpace's tests this year, bringing the total number of covered lives to 285 million.

ThyGenX-ThyraMir combination testing can help determine the presence and absence of cancer in thyroid nodules. Testing includes the rule-in properties of next-generation sequencing of a patient's DNA and RNA and the rule-out capabilities of a microRNA classifier, respectively. Based on current performance, about 90 percent of ThyGenX cases are reflexed to ThyraMir for additional assessment, Interpace said.

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