Close Menu

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The US Food and Drug Administration has authorized the use of a PCR-based test for the diagnosis of the Ebola Zaire virus.

The test was developed by the US Department of Defense and uses Thermo Fisher Scientific Life Technologies' TaqMan technology. It is authorized by FDA for use in laboratories "designated by DoD to help facilitate effective responses to the ongoing Ebola outbreak detected in West Africa," a spokesperson for the FDA said in an email to GenomeWeb Daily News.

To read the full story....

...and receive Daily News bulletins.

Already have a GenomeWeb or 360Dx account?
Login Now.

Don't have a GenomeWeb or 360Dx account?
Register for Free.

The Washington Post reports that the White House chief of staff has asked the US Food and Drug Administration to justify the stricter standards it is seeking for a coronavirus vaccine.

UK Royal Statistical Society is organizing a working group to develop guidelines for assessing COVID-19 tests, the Guardian reports.

President Donald Trump's "good genes" comment raises eugenics concerns, CNN reports.

In PLOS this week: genetic analysis of tremor condition, analysis of a West and Central African tree used in traditional medicine, and more.

Sep
30
Sponsored by
LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) continues to expand globally to support maternal-fetal patient care. 

Oct
01
Sponsored by
Adaptive Biotechnologies

T cells are the adaptive immune system’s first responders to any virus, circulating in the blood to detect and quickly multiply to attack the virus, and also support the development of antibodies by B cells. 

Oct
08
Sponsored by
Genecentric

This webinar, Part 3 of the “Advances in RNA-based Biomarker Development for Precision Oncology” webinar series sponsored by GeneCentric Therapeutics, will discuss novel and emerging applications of RNA-based genomic analysis in precision oncology, form characterizing the tumor microenvironment to informing the development of immuno-oncology treatments.

Oct
14
Sponsored by
Inivata

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can allow clinicians and researchers to better understand which patients are at high risk of recurrence and should be offered intensified chemotherapy or selected for clinical trials.