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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Roche's Cobas HIV-1 viral load test, the company announced today.

The test runs on the Roche Cobas 6800 and 8800 platforms. It uses a dual-target technology to amplify and detect two separate regions of the HIV-1 genome not subject to selective pressure. The fully-automated Cobas systems provide up to 96 results in less than 3.5 hours, with a total number of results in an eight-hour shift of 384 for the 6800 system, and 960 for the 8800 system, Roche said in a statement.

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