NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Diagnostics developer Diassess has been awarded a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institutes of Health to support further development of a rapid, instrument-free gonorrhea test.

The funding, which totals $716,689 in the first year of a two-year grant, follows $707,926 in year-one Phase II SBIR funds awarded in June of last year for chlamydia assay development.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a GenomeWeb or 360Dx Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

In PLOS this week: grey wolf population genomics, mutations associated with lung adenocarcinoma survival, and more.

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.

Nov
29
Sponsored by
Schott

This webinar will discuss how understanding the relative performance characteristics of glass and polymer substrates for in vitro diagnostic applications such as microarrays and microfluidics can help to optimize diagnostic performance.

Dec
03
Sponsored by
Advanced Cell Diagnostics

This webinar will demonstrate how a research team at the National Institutes of Health evaluated a novel in situ hybridization approach and applied it to study splice variants related to schizophrenia.

Dec
12
Sponsored by
Illumina

This webinar will discuss the use of shotgun metagenomics to identify children at risk of hospital-acquired infection.