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Cue Partners With J&J's Janssen Pharma on HIV Viral Load Assay

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Cue, a San Diego-based developer of analyte detection technologies, is collaborating with Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Pharmaceuticals to develop a quantitative HIV viral load test for resource-poor settings.

Under the agreement, which was facilitated by Johnson & Johnson Innovation, the partners will work to develop an affordable, portable, easy-to-use, and internet-enabled HIV quantitative viral load test using Cue's Lab-In-A-Box molecular diagnostics platform.

The test will combine proprietary nucleic acid amplification technology with Cue's cartridge-based system for molecular detection, which it currently uses to offer consumers assays for vitamin D and testosterone levels, inflammation, fertility, and influenza infection for general health and wellness monitoring.

"We're excited to work with Janssen, a leader in the HIV field, to accelerate the development of the HIV quantitative viral load test on Cue's platform," CEO Ayub Khattak said in a statement. "Together we can make a big impact on this significant global health challenge by bringing simplicity, immediacy, and affordability to the field of HIV viral load testing in an unprecedented way."

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