NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Detecting point mutations that confer drug resistance in HIV's RNA-based genome is routine in resource-rich settings. In low-resource locations, however, such personalized medical treatment is a challenge.

Now, using K103N mutant HIV-1 as a test case, researchers at Brown University have developed a method that allows RNA point mutations to be detected in a single step. They have also begun adapting the technique to a microfluidic device that may some day be suitable for point-of-care use in global settings without high-tech labs.

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