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Bio-Rad Laboratories, Diagenode Partner to Offer Single Cell ATAC-Seq Services

NEW YORK – Epigenetics research and sample preparation service provider Diagenode announced Tuesday that it has partnered with Bio-Rad Laboratories to offer its single-cell transposase accessible chromatin by sequencing (ATAC-seq) services on Bio-Rad's droplet digital technology. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The Diagenode scATAC-Seq services will utilize Bio-Rad's ddSEQ Single-Cell Isolator to encapsulate thousands of cell nuclei or whole cells into nanoliter-sized droplets and offer robust precision and quantification of data, the firm said in a statement.

"By working together to combine our expertise, we look forward to accelerating epigenetics and gene regulation research at the single-cell level," said Kris Simonyi, global marketing manager of Bio-Rad's Digital Biology Group.

For epigenetics studies, Diagenode offers shearing and automation instruments, reagent kits, antibodies to streamline DNA methylation, noncoding RNA-seq, ChIP, and ChIP-seq workflows. The company's newest products include a full automation system, a Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) Kit providing eight times more coverage than standard technologies, and ChIPmentation and ChIP-seq kits for only 10,000 cells. Bio-Rad also recently launched a single-cell chromatin profiling assay that is based on ATAC-seq technology.

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