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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: precision medicine strategy to screen for disease risk, genome evolution in Haemophilus influenzae, and more.

By switching off tumor suppressor genes in immunocompetent mice, the team saw that liver cancer developed and killed the mice within four to five months.  

Cordlife Group, a Singapore-based consumer healthcare company, has partnered with US company PlumCare to offer genetic testing services in Asia.

CNN reports that researchers have tied a new variant to opioid addiction risk.

Independent research teams identified mutations in a chloride ion channel gene in some cases of aldosteronism, a condition that can cause severe hypertension.

Shrinking genome sizes might have enabled flowering plants to be successful, Quanta magazine's Abstractions blog reports.

Researchers are using gene expression and more to work out the evolution of pregnancy, Nature reports.

New research suggests that some risky and protective variants in the LRRK2 gene have shared genetic effects in Crohn's disease and Parkinson's disease.

The team hopes to commercialize the technology by producing cost-effective tests to rapidly diagnose common upper respiratory viral pathogens.

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In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.

In recent weeks, the direct-to-consumer genetics firm has rolled out a health hub where customers can share information concerning 18 common health conditions.

In PLOS this week, new genes associated with prostate cancer risk, genetic patterns in M. bovis, and more.