Wistar Institute

OncoCyte is proceeding full-steam ahead on commercializing the gene expression-based test, pursuing CLIA certification and a Q2 2017 launch.

The partnership will place the Graham Cancer Center's Gene Editing Institute under the purview of the Wistar Institute's Molecular Screening Facility.

The partners will identify novel drug targets in cancer, aging, and immune disorders, for which PhoreMost will develop small-molecule therapeutics.

Researchers believe the expression of Gabra3 promotes breast cancer metastasis, but that an RNA-edited form of Gabra3 suppresses it.

Last year, Wistar researchers presented data showing that the test could distinguish patients with malignant lung nodules from those with benign or no nodules.

The partners will further develop a non-invasive, blood-based test for the early detection of lung cancer.

The consortium will conduct research into how metastatic breast cancer cells break away and spread to other organs.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The Wistar Institute has received a $12.1 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to fund collaborative research projects with University of Pennsylvania scientists focused on developing targeted skin cancer therapies, Wistar said on Tuesday.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A National Cancer Institute review panel has recommended that the Wistar Institute Cancer Center receive $14.9 million in renewal funding to support resources and infrastructure for a range of molecular cancer research activities.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – BioTime subsidiary OncoCyte today announced that it will collaborate with the Wistar Institute on the development of a gene expression-based lung cancer test.

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.