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Mere weeks after the 2019-nCoV sequence was released, firms, agencies, and research groups have already created PCR-based tests.

The Los Angeles Times reports that a case of the novel coronavirus making people ill in China has been reported in the US. 

Sequencing analysis has tied a new coronavirus to the pneumonia outbreak occurring in China, Vox reports.

Keep Them or Not?

NPR says the explosion and fire earlier this week at a Russian lab that stores dangerous pathogens revives the question of whether such samples should be kept.

The NAM, NAS, and Royal Society have formed a commission to develop a framework on the proper use of genome editing, and convened its first meeting in Washington, DC, this week.

The World Health Organization says it accepts its panel's finding that moving forward with clinical applications of germline genome editing would be irresponsible.

Essential Meds

The World Health Organization has updated its list of essential medicines, Reuters reports.

The commission will develop a framework for scientists, clinicians, and regulatory authorities on the appropriate use of human germline genome editing. 

A WHO panel is calling for a global registry of human germline gene-editing projects, according to Stat News.

WHO Reorganizes a Bit

The World Health Organization has announced that it would be making some organizational changes, the New York Times reports.

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A genetic genealogy analysis helped secure the release of a California man from prison after getting his murder conviction overturned, the Guardian reports.

Researchers have uncovered large bacteriophages whose genomes include translational machinery, Live Science reports.

Technology Review discusses the concerns that come along with the ability to quickly synthesize viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

In PNAS this week: role for Myc in alternative splicing regulation in prostate cancer, variation in methylation in Arabidopsis, and more.