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The NAM, NAS, and Royal Society have formed a commission to develop a framework on the proper use of genome editing, and convened its first meeting in Washington, DC, this week.

The World Health Organization says it accepts its panel's finding that moving forward with clinical applications of germline genome editing would be irresponsible.

Essential Meds

The World Health Organization has updated its list of essential medicines, Reuters reports.

The commission will develop a framework for scientists, clinicians, and regulatory authorities on the appropriate use of human germline genome editing. 

A WHO panel is calling for a global registry of human germline gene-editing projects, according to Stat News.

WHO Reorganizes a Bit

The World Health Organization has announced that it would be making some organizational changes, the New York Times reports.

CRISPR technology has made its way around the world, but in the wake of the He Jiankui controversy, the industry is asking what recourse it has against misuse.

WHO Panel Announced

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

To Track Cholera

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

The World Health Organization is putting together a panel of experts to develop guidelines and standards for gene editing, according to Reuters.

Pages

Retraction Watch reports that a paper was pulled because it refers to a gene that doesn't exist in mice.

Researchers were able to generate fertilized northern white rhinoceros eggs, according to Mashable.

Former Orig3n employees raise concerns about its testing at Bloomberg Businessweek.

In PLOS this week: microRNA expression changes in hepatocellular carcinoma, real-time PCR-based approach for diagnosing schistosomiasis, and more.