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In Nature this week: genomic analysis of ducks, whole-genome doubling among tumor samples, and more.

A new Nature Biotechnology paper reports that CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing can lead to large deletions or complex rearrangements that could be pathogenic.

An international team of researchers compared genetic changes that occur in the blood of people who develop acute myeloid leukemia and those who do not.

The researchers also reported that cholera strains infecting members of the same household were highly similar, suggesting in-household transmissions.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine's Sharon Peacock argued a sequencing-based pathogen surveillance approach could uncover outbreaks faster.

Sequencing the genomes of a half a dozen chimp- or gorilla-infecting malaria parasites provided a clearer picture of Plasmodium falciparum evolution.

An analysis of more than 1,000 Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomes provided insights into antibiotic resistance patterns and related genomic features.

Independent research teams identified and sequenced hepatitis B strains going back thousands of years from samples in Europe, uncovering now-extinct lineages.

Using genome sequences for hundreds of ancient individuals, researchers have analyzed population dynamics and displacements around the Eurasian steppe.

While digging into the tumor-suppressive mechanism for an X-linked gene called UTX, researchers found a similar protective role for the Y chromosome gene UTY.

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ScienceInsider reports that rude and unprofessional paper reviewers are common and can have harmful effects.

The US Senate has confirmed Stephen Hahn as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, according to the New York Times.

CNBC reports Apple is partnering with Color Genomics to offer its employees free DNA screening for disease.

In Science this week: researchers use CRISPR tool to find gut microbiome molecules involved in immunity, and more.