Weill Cornell

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient Southeast Asian genomes provide insight on human migration, and more.

The CATCH-KB database is a standardized variant repository meant to support new research into prevention of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity.

After three years of work, the EXaCT-1 exome cancer test has become part of clinical cancer care at NewYork-Presbyterian, but developers have higher ambitions.

Following last year's test of FHIR Genomics, a diverse set of organizations will look to demonstrate that the standard can help them feed genomic data to EHRs.

The Qiagen-led Allele Frequency Community, founded in 2015, is improving the diagnosis of rare diseases by offering ethnically diverse reference sets.

Bursts of Activity

The NASA Twins Study says being in space leads to altered DNA methylation and expression, Space.com reports.

In Genome Biology this week: computational tool to uncover cancer driver mutations, microbial species linked to ankylosing spondylitis, and more.

The company hopes to raise funding this summer and has been conducting pilots with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

"Precision metagenomics" and "geospatially informed medical care" are among the long-term goals of the $5 million WorldQuant Initiative for Quantitative Prediction at Weill Cornell Medicine.

The medical school is launching the program with the support of a $5 million gift from investment firm WorldQuant and its founder.

Pages

Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.