Wayne State University | GenomeWeb

Wayne State University

Several academic and commercial groups are developing clinical cell-based noninvasive prenatal tests, which could eventually compete with current cell-free NIPTs.

The team has been monitoring changes in host gene expression patterns due to different types of infections, and hopes to develop a diagnostic test.

The grant, worth $1.4 million in its first year, will be used to develop a panel of RNA expression signatures that can diagnose infections in febrile infants.

The five-year grant will support optimizing the use of polymyxin B to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections and identify protein biomarkers of drug-associated toxicity.

Scientists from Wayne State University have found a set of 648 sperm RNA elements that could predict male fertility and help inform couples trying to conceive.

Three collaborators will further explore the clinical usefulness of a TAA panel in early cancer detection and measuring response to cancer immunotherapy.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A team from Wayne State University and Michigan's Isle Royale National Park have demonstrated the feasibility of using Ion Torrent sequencing to assess microbial community samples being introduced into the environment.

Title: Method for enhancing current throughput in an electrochemical system.
Patent Number: 8,753,492
Filed: June 17, 2011

Stanford University of Palo Alto, Calif., 8,614,056, "Microfluidic method for measurement or detection involving cells or biomolecules." The patent relates to devices for detecting or determining the concentration of of biomolecules.

Ibis Biosciences (Abbott) has been awarded US Patent No. 8,242,254, "Compositions for use in identification of bacteria."
Rangarajan Sampath, Thomas Hall, David Ecker, and Lawrence Blyn are named as inventors on the patent.

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In PLOS this week: nasal microbial communities in asthma patients; sequencing-based way to detect, track schistosomiasis; and more.

The New York Times speaks with Vanderbilt's John Anthony Capra about Neanderthal genes in modern humans.

A draft guidance from the FDA suggests the agency wants to more tightly control gene-edited animals, according to Technology Review.

Researchers were among this weekend's protesters bemoaning the new US administration, Vox reports.