Washington University

A decade after their team at WashU sequenced the first tumor-normal genome pair, Mardis and Wilson are bringing cancer genomics to the clinic at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

Through a genome-wide association study and meta-analysis, researchers saw dozens of new and known blood pressure loci, including ancestry-specific associations.

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: circular RNAs in infantile hemangiomas, pathogenic mutations in Alzheimer's disease, and more.

Washington University will partner with CureOne to link its NGS-based cancer tests with the N1 Registry, where patients can find treatment and outcomes data.

The lung cancer institute will work with Inivata to study the use of ctDNA testing in patients with early lung cancer after surgery.

Results from a randomized clinical trial known as GIFT suggest that genotype-guided warfarin dosing is linked to fewer adverse events than clinical dosing.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: wild tetraploid wheat genome, and more.

The university has renamed its genomics center, specializing in the gut microbiome, the Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology.

Results from up to eight stages of mouse or human retina development highlight the importance of histone modifications and other epigenetic shifts during differentiation.


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.