Washington University

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: circular RNAs in infantile hemangiomas, pathogenic mutations in Alzheimer's disease, and more.

Washington University will partner with CureOne to link its NGS-based cancer tests with the N1 Registry, where patients can find treatment and outcomes data.

The lung cancer institute will work with Inivata to study the use of ctDNA testing in patients with early lung cancer after surgery.

Results from a randomized clinical trial known as GIFT suggest that genotype-guided warfarin dosing is linked to fewer adverse events than clinical dosing.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: wild tetraploid wheat genome, and more.

The university has renamed its genomics center, specializing in the gut microbiome, the Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology.

Results from up to eight stages of mouse or human retina development highlight the importance of histone modifications and other epigenetic shifts during differentiation.

Researchers reported that structural variants also tend to have larger effect sizes than single-nucleotide variants or insertions and deletions.

The technology, called Tunr, involves targeting translation elongation by introducing consecutive adenosine nucleotides into a gene coding sequence of interest.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.