VA

IBM's supercomputing platform will continue to provide AI support to advanced cancer patients at VA medical centers for at least another year.

A Veterans Health Administration subcommittee evaluated the clinical utility of 30 pharmacogenetic tests and recommended about half for wider use.

The company will provide the services for the VA's Million Veteran Program, which is studying the link between genes and disease in US veteran volunteers.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

At the Precision Medicine World Conference this week, researchers discussed how they plan to return genomic results to participants of research-focused sequencing studies.

Cohort of Veterans

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel writes that veterans are signing up for the Million Veteran Program.

The contract was awarded as part of the VA's Precision Oncology Program, which aims to provide advanced clinical care and generate cancer biomarker data.

The $12 million PRIME study will involve 2,000 veterans with major depressive disorder and 250 healthcare providers across 21 VA medical centers.

The company, which first signed on to provide services to the VA's Million Veteran Program in 2013, will provide the department with 34,000 more genomes.

The test analyzes clinically relevant genetic variants for 14 genes related to certain pain and mental health medication responses to help guide clinicians' prescribing decisions.

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With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.

NPR reports that government and private insurers are being slow to cover recently approved CAR-T cell therapies.

CNBC reports that there are thousands of genetic tests available for consumers to chose between.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of ducks, whole-genome doubling among tumor samples, and more.