USAMRIID

Results from a set of new studies suggest Zika virus circulated undetected for long periods of time before producing infections described in recent outbreaks.

EDGE cobbles together several open-source tools into simple pipelines for sequence assembly, taxonomic classification, phylogenetic analysis, and other tasks.

US Army scientists have developed a way to more precisely determine the amount of antigen needed as they develop an Ebola virus-like particle vaccine.

Ebola virus genomes from a post-epidemic flare-up last June showed relatively low genetic divergence compared with related strains from the broader outbreak.

Using new and existing Ebola virus genomes, researchers retraced transmission events involved in the second wave of infections in Liberia.

New research suggests Ebola virus may appear in survivor sperm samples some nine months after disease onset, though sexual transmission appears relatively rare. 

A new study has found that an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test for Ebola could be more reliable under certain circumstances than a recently approved RT-PCR assay for the virus.

Researchers sequenced 25 Ebola genomes isolated from patients infected during the outbreak, publishing their results in Emerging Infectious Diseases

The team tracked down several hundred SNPs in the Ebola genome, including mutations that could alter the effectiveness of treatments targeting certain virus sequences.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Luminex said today that the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) is using Luminex's xMAP technology to develop rapid diagnostics for the Ebola virus.

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The president of France's National Research Agency has resigned, according to Nature News.

A senator wants a "right-to-try" provision in the US Food and Drug Administration funding bill, but an ethicist says at Stat News that it would undermine the role of clinical trials.

In PNAS this week: red algae Porphyra umbicalis genome, deep neural network model for sequencing peptides, and more.

The Guardian's Barbara Ellen has tried out some DNA testing services to see whether they provide valuable information.