Uppsala University

Researchers report that even people with a high genetic risk of heart disease benefit from exercise, according to Time magazine.

New ancient DNA studies have revealed female-biased migrations into Bavaria during the Middle Ages and more ancient Neolithic farmer expansions into Iberia.

Keep Track

Scientists call for addressing the effects of investigator gender on research results, NPR reports.

By sequencing seven new Mesolithic individuals, researchers retraced two hunter-gatherer migrations into Scandinavia after the Last Glacial Maximum.

Over the next three years, Immunovia and its partners will use the firm's Immray PanCan-d assay to screen 6,000 diabetes patients for pancreatic cancer.

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

With genetic data for seven Stone and Iron Age individuals, researchers estimate that human populations in southern Africa started diverging more than 260,000 years ago.

By genotyping hundreds of individuals from populations in Sudan and South Sudan, investigators untangled genetic contributions from Eurasian groups migrating into Africa.

UK and Swedish researchers used a Mendelian randomization approach to study the association between serum calcium and heart disease and heart attack risk.

What the Birds Sing

Uppsala University researchers have found that the songs of flycatchers may be genetically determined, according to Agence France Presse.

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The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.