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A twin study uncovers evidence that genes may influence whether someone gets a dog, Martha Stewart reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: signals of natural selection among Indigenous populations of North America, population and social structures of several European Stone Age burial sites, and more.

Modern Grauer's gorillas have experienced a decline in genetic diversity, more so than mountain gorillas, even as both have experienced population decline.

A new analysis found kidney disease-related pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in exomes for roughly 9 percent of individuals with chronic kidney disease.

Though the effect of reference bias was inconsistent, the authors of a new study said it highlights the need for tools or approaches to minimize it.

Led by researchers at BBMRI-ERIC, the effort intends to clarify how entities should share data, including genomics information, across institutions and countries.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: effect of PD-L1 expression on immunotherapy response, endogenous retrovirus segregation in European rabbits, and more.

Researchers report that even people with a high genetic risk of heart disease benefit from exercise, according to Time magazine.

New ancient DNA studies have revealed female-biased migrations into Bavaria during the Middle Ages and more ancient Neolithic farmer expansions into Iberia.

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Scientists call for addressing the effects of investigator gender on research results, NPR reports.

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A new analysis finds that it will be more than a century until female computer scientists publish at the same rate as their male counterparts, ScienceInsider reports.

New US Department of Commerce rules will affect supercomputing in China, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Broad Institute researchers describe an approach they've dubbed "DNA microscopy."

In PLOS this week: epigenetic changes following hepatitis C virus treatment, metagenomic analysis of Ugandan children with febrile illness, and more.